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    Knowledgebase article

    Article ID 2201
    Summary Action photography with Capture One
    Problem How do I get some good action shots ?
    Solution ACTION PHOTOGRAPHY
    By photographer Frank Hoppen

    Developing the same frame with different parameters in Capture One lets me do the impossible in action photography - that is bracketing the luminance and color of one action shot. Instead of using levels and curves in Photoshop, I develop independent images from the same frame in Capture One.

    Let’s say an image with an overall good look of the main object, but with maybe a flat overexposed background and sky, due to low ambient light. I then develop that same frame with dark and contrasty setting to bring out a dramatically sky; then another lighter one to open shadows; and one other last one with a ‘wrong’ color balance to bring color into sky. Since all of them were developed from the same frame, every single pixel is aligning up on the same spot when you move them above each other in Photoshop (hold down SHIFT when dragging).

    Now put a black mask on each additional layer and use a white brush on the black layer mask (a pressure sensitive table is a must) and let the effect of each additional image (impressive sky, open shadow, beautiful 'unreal' color) reveal while painting with an opacity of 25% per each stroke. The beauty about this is that you are not shoveling pixels and shades around in Photoshop, you are working with different developed 16 bit images and can do the fine-tuning from an intact full range image, instead of pushing the envelope from one image and risking banding, posterisation or other pitfalls in Photoshop to begin with


    © Frank Hoppen




    Last updated May 16, 2007